Fresh off the University of Arizona Press: May book releases

Sunday, May 14, 2023

Indigenous Justice and Gender

Edited by Marianne O. Nielsen and Karen Jarratt-Snider

This new volume offers a broad overview of topics pertaining to gender-related health, violence, and healing. Employing a strength-based approach (as opposed to a deficit model), the chapters address the resiliency of Indigenous women and two-spirit people in the face of colonial violence and structural racism. Part of the UA Press Indigenous Justice Series.

Pyrocene Park: A Journey into the Fire History of Yosemite National Park

By Stephen J. Pyne

In the last decade, fire has blasted into public attention. California’s blazes have captured national and global media interest with their drama and urgency. Expand the realm of fire to include the burning of fossil fuels, and the fire story also subsumes climate change. Renowned fire historian Stephen J. Pyne argues that the relationship between fire and humans has become a defining feature of our epoch, and he reveals how Yosemite offers a cameo of how we have replaced an ice age with a fire age: the Pyrocene.

Urban Imaginaries in Native Amazonia, Tales of Alterity, Power, and Defiance

Edited by Fernando Santos-Granero and Emanuele Fabiano

Urban life has long intrigued Indigenous Amazonians, who regard cities as the locus of both extraordinary power and danger. Modern and ancient cities alike have thus become models for the representation of extreme alterity under the guise of supernatural enchanted cities. This volume seeks to analyze how these ambiguous urban imaginaries express a singular view of cosmopolitical relations, how they inform and shape forest-city interactions, and the history of how they came into existence.

Persistence of Good Living, A'uwe Life Cycles and Well-Being in the Central Brazilian Cerrados

By James R. Welch

Cultural understandings of well-being often differ from scientific measures such as health, happiness, and affluence. For the Indigenous A’uwẽ (Xavante) people in the tropical savannas of Brazil, special forms of intimate and antagonistic social relations, camaraderie, suffering, and engagement with the environment are fundamental aspects of community wellness. Anthropologist James R. Welch transparently presents ethnographic insights from his long-term fieldwork in two A’uwẽ communities.

Book links

Indigenous Justice and Gender

Pyrocene Park: A Journey into the Fire History of Yosemite National Park

Urban Imaginaries in Native Amazonia, Tales of Alterity, Power, and Defiance

Persistence of Good Living, A'uwe Life Cycles and Well-Being in the Central Brazilian Cerrados

About the University of Arizona Press

The University of Arizona Press (UA Press) is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. UA Press disseminates ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. UA Press advances the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.